Best Kettlebell Biceps Workout Exercises

Kettlebell biceps workout exercises create tension in the muscles that causes micro-tears that result in muscle growth. The benefit of adding a kettlebell biceps workout routine to an existing plan is that they fill in the traditional arm exercise gaps. Kettlebell exercises maintain tension longer, which stresses the muscles more, leading to greater hypertrophy.

Best Kettlebell Biceps Workout Exercises for Muscle Growth
Best Kettlebell Biceps Workout Exercises for Muscle Growth

The downside to a gym kettlebell biceps workout routine is that improper form could lead to hand, shoulder, and back injuries. Using a poor grip could cause damage to the hands and bruising up the arms. It also takes longer to master these exercises, and not everyone takes their time.

The advantages to using kettlebells are the chance to grow muscles faster and balance other arm exercises. Kettlebells allow lifters to add tension at the top position in ways that other equipment cannot. Common mistakes with the kettlebells include poor form, improper grip, and moving through the exercises too fast.

The best workout for kettlebell biceps muscles involves patience and focus on form. Lifters who master kettlebells can make real gains in muscle growth and strength. All athletes can benefit from kettlebell biceps workout hacks to balance existing upper body routines.

The best kettlebell biceps workout exercises are listed below.

  1. Most beneficial: Ballistic Curl
  2. Best for working biceps and forearms: Hanging Curl
  3. Best for working biceps and upper back: Bicep Curl
  4. Best for building strength fast: Hammer Curl
  5. Build elbow flexors fast: Kneeling Preacher Curl
  6. Best for strength training: Single Arm Cop Hold Curl
  7. Best for balancing bicep size: Single Arm Bicep Curl
  8. Improve grip strength fast: Armpit Curl
  9. Best for singling out the biceps: Single Arm Reverse Curl
  10. Best for building overall power: Hang Clean

Table of Contents

1. Ballistic Curl

The ballistic curl is an intermediate kettlebell biceps muscles exercise that works the arms harder with less effort. This exercise also works the chest and shoulders.

Ballistic curls use the kettlebell to provide resistance to improve stability and strength in the biceps. To perform this exercise, stand with feet slightly wider than the shoulders. Hold the kettlebell in one hand with the palm facing the body. Lift the kettlebell up into a curl by rotating the palm outward on the way up. Pause for a few seconds then lower back to the starting position.

Common mistakes for performing a ballistic curl with kettlebells involve poor form and incorrect grip. The rotation that comes from starting with palm in and moving to palm out is key to working the biceps, but it requires focus. Additionally, the back should remain neutral to avoid strains.

Variations of this exercise include a standing barbell curl, standing E-Z bar curl, and seated barbell curl.

Add this exercise into any upper body routine one to three times per week. Men and women can benefit from this exercise because it builds strength and stability in the biceps while increasing endurance. Children should not perform this exercise. 

Athletes across all specialties, including calisthenics, bodybuilders, swimmers, and runners can benefit from the increased power, flexibility, and stability that come with this exercise.

Perform one to three sets of six to eight reps with a moderate to heavy weight to focus on muscle growth. For overall effectiveness, do two or three sets of 12 to 15 reps with a light to medium weight.

Ballistic Curl Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Muscles

Variations of the kettlebell ballistic curl involve using different equipment and altering the grip to target the biceps in different ways for a more comprehensive workout.

Of these variations, the standing barbell curl could be the most popular alternative and commonly seen in the gym. The standing barbell curl is the best variation for building mass, while the seated barbell curl focuses more on strength by challenging the muscles at the top range of motion. 

These are the main kettlebell ballistic curl variations:

  1. Standing Barbell curl (standard, close grip, wide grip)
  2. Standing EZ-bar curl (standard, close grip, wide grip)
  3. Seated barbell curl (emphasizing top half of range of motion)

1. Standing Barbell Curl (Standard, Close Grip, Wide Grip)

The standing barbell curl works the biceps brachii and brachialis, and it’s one of the most effective for building muscle.

To perform a standing barbell curl, stand with feet shoulder-width apart and core engaged. Hold the barbell with hands just wider than the hips. 

Keeping the elbows tight to the body, lift the bar toward the shoulders, be careful to maintain tension in the biceps, pause at the top, and release slowly. 

Alternately, using a closer or wider grip allows athletes to work the biceps from slightly different angles. The alternate grips also engage the forearms, shoulders, upper back, and chest differently.

Common mistakes for the standing barbell curl involve poor form and using too much weight. Lifters should use enough weight to provide resistance while allowing for a full range of motion and smooth, controlled movements.

The standing barbell curl is a popular choice for building strength and mass. It’s a stepstone to increasing weight used for dumbbell curls while providing better elbow stability. 

Standing bicep curls are an intermediate-level exercise. Lifters should have enough strength and control to manage the lift. For best results, do one to three sets of 10 to 12 reps with moderate weight. 

2. Standing EZ-Bar Curl (Standard, Close grip, Wide Grip)

Standing EZ-bar curls target the biceps brachii but also work the brachialis, brachioradialis, and even the forearms to a degree. 

To perform a standing EZ-bar curl, stand with feet in line with the shoulders. Keep a slight bend in the knees. Beginners may want to stand against a wall to support the back and focus on the arms.

Hold the bar with hands just outside the hips. Lift the bar up to the chest while keeping the elbows tight to the body. 

Common mistakes for the movement involve using too much weight to maintain proper form and relying on momentum instead of creating tension in the biceps. If it’s too hard to maintain control, try reducing the weight to a manageable level, even if it means just using the bar.

Standing EZ-bar curls are excellent for beginners hoping to learn the proper form. Intermediate to advanced lifters can use this variation to work with more weight and make gains that translate to other exercises, including dumbbell curls. 

Beginners should start with lighter weights and one to three sets of 10 to 15 reps with a focus on form. Intermediate to advanced lifters may prefer one to three sets of six to eight reps with moderate to heavy weight to make gains in mass and strength.

3. Seated Barbell Curl (Emphasizing Top Half of Range of Motion)

This kettlebell biceps exercise variation targets the brachii and brachialis to create better stability in the elbows while building strength and mass. Lifters also target the brachioradialis and forearm flexors with this isolation exercise.

To perform a seated barbell curl, sit on a bench with feet flat on the floor. Hold the barbell across the lap with hands just outside the hips. 

Keeping the elbows and bar close to the body, curl the weight up until the forearms reach the biceps. Pause for a few seconds, then slowly release.

Common mistakes for the movement include poor form and rushing the movement. This exercise is an isolation maneuver that targets the biceps at the top of the curl motion to make notable strength gains. Focus on slow, controlled movements and keeping the back stable.

The seated barbell curl is a popular choice for intermediate to advanced lifters who want to isolate the muscles at the top of the range of motion. 

It’s ideal for breaking out of a plateau, meaning it’s best to go with heavier weight and fewer reps. Try one to three sets of three to five reps with a heavy focus on form.

2. Hanging Curl

The hanging curl is another isolation exercise that works the biceps by forcing them to do the work instead of adding in the back and shoulders. This exercise also works the forearms. 

Choosing the hanging curl as a kettlebell biceps exercise is ideal for focusing on the biceps and forearms to increase overall strength in the arms.

To perform hanging curls, sit on a preacher curl bench so that the chest is against it. This removes the back and shoulders from the equation and forces the arms to do the work.

Let the arms hang down with kettlebells in hand. Curl the kettlebells toward the face, pause at the top of the motion, then slowly release to the starting position.

Common mistakes for performing the hanging curl involve using too much weight. Use just enough weight to create tension in the biceps while maintaining complete control over the entire movement.

Variations of the hanging curl include the cable straight-bar kettlebell biceps curl, squatting cable EZ-bar kettlebell biceps curl, standing reverse-grip cable curl, and lying cable kettlebell biceps curl.

Add the hanging curl into an upper body workout one to three times per week.

Men and women can make gains in strength by working the hanging curl into regular upper body routines. Children should not perform this exercise. 

Any athlete seeking to build upper body strength, especially in the biceps, should consider trying the hanging curl. It’s an effective power-building exercise that can benefit bodybuilders, swimmers, and runners.

Athletes should use light to moderate weight over two to three sets of 12 to 15 reps for increasing strength and endurance. To focus on mass building, use heavier weights over one to three sets of five to eight reps.

Hanging Curl Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Workout Routines

Hanging curl variations use different equipment and stances to alter how the movement works the biceps. These alterations address the muscles from slightly different angles and challenge athletes to isolate the muscles. 

A cable straight-bar curl is a popular option because it uses a cable machine and straight bar, which are accessible at most gyms. For building strength and mass, the EZ-bar cable curl or reverse-grip cable curl would be the most productive.

These are the most common hanging curl variations:

  1. Cable straight-bar Kettlebell Biceps curl
  2. Squatting cable EZ-bar Kettlebell Biceps curl
  3. Standing reverse-grip cable curl
  4. Lying cable Kettlebell Biceps curl

1. Cable Straight-Bar Kettlebell Biceps Curl

The cable straight-bar curl targets the biceps by forcing the lifter to focus on creating tension while relying on the cable for resistance.

To perform a cable straight-bar curl, attach a straight bar to the cable machine and select an appropriate weight. Stand with feet in line with the shoulders and hold the bar with an underhand grip. 

Curl the bar toward the chest, pausing at the top of the motion. Slowly release to the starting position.

Common mistakes for the movement involve arching the back and relying too much on momentum. Maintain a neutral spine and focus on slow, controlled movements.

Like other cable-based exercises, the straight bar curl is a beginner-friendly exercise that helps perfect form while increasing strength and endurance. Start with light to moderate weight to focus on proper form. Perform one to three sets of 12 to 18 reps.

2. Squatting Cable EZ-Bar Kettlebell Biceps Curl

The squatting cable EZ-bar curl targets the biceps and works the lower body by maintaining a squat throughout.

To perform a squatting cable EZ-bar curl, connect an EZ-bar to the cable machine. Squat and hold the bar with both hands using an underhand grip. Curl the bar toward the chin, pause for a few seconds, then slowly release to the starting position.

Common mistakes for this exercise include using insufficient weight and poor form. It’s important to focus on solid squatting form before starting the curl. Also, using too little weight increases the likelihood of moving too fast through the exercise and results in no gains.

This exercise is popular as a substitute for the hanging curl when a preacher curl bench isn’t available. Intermediate and advanced lifters can make strength gains with this exercise that also engages the lower body. Use moderate to heavy weight for one to three sets of six to eight reps.

3. Standing Reverse-Grip Cable Curl

The standing reverse-grip cable curl works the brachii, brachioradialis, and forearms.

To perform this exercise, use a straight bar or EZ-bar with the cable machine. Hold the bar with an overhand grip, careful not to wrap the thumbs around the bar. 

Keeping the elbows near the body, pull the hands toward the shoulders in a reverse curl. Pause for a few seconds, then slowly release to the starting position.

The most common mistake for this exercise is wrapping the thumbs around the bar. While it’s not wrong, it lessens the tension in the brachioradialis. 

This beginner-friendly variation of the hanging curl is popular for developing form and alternating an exercise routine. Perform three to four sets of six to 10 reps with moderate weight.

4. Lying Cable Kettlebell Biceps Curl

Lying cable bicep curls target the biceps to build strength. To perform a lying cable curl, lie on the back on the ground or on a bench with the feet facing the cable machine. Start with arms at the sides and pull through the curl toward the chest. Pause for a few seconds before slowly releasing to the starting position.

The most common mistake is not using the proper form to complete each movement. Focusing on slow, controlled movements and squeezing at the top and bottom of each rep allow lifters to isolate the biceps and make real gains.

This beginner-friendly exercise is popular for building strength and feeling the burn after a workout. Use low to moderate weight across three to five sets of 10 to 15 reps. 

3. Bicep Curl

Bicep curls target the brachialis, brachii, and brachioradialis muscles. To a lesser degree, this exercise works the forearms and core.

Bicep Curl
Bicep Curl

The bicep curl exercise is one of the best ways to increase strength in the upper arm while toning the muscles at the front of the arm. Lifters can perform a single-arm bicep curl to focus on one arm at a time. 

To perform a kettlebell bicep curl, stand with feet in line with the shoulders. Grip the kettlebell handle with both hands. Keeping the elbows close to the body, lift toward the chest.

Common mistakes for performing bicep curls include using too much weight and poor form. Using excessive weight makes it too difficult to maintain the proper form which can lead to injury. It’s also important to use slow, controlled movements and avoid swinging the kettlebell.

Variations of the bicep curl include the standing dumbbell curl, seated dumbbell curl, Zottman curl, incline dumbbell curl, and palms-out incline curl. 

Add bicep curls with a kettlebell one to three times per week as part of an upper-body routine. Men and women can improve strength and tone in the upper arms with bicep curls. Children should not perform the bicep curl.

The bicep curl exercise is low impact and easy enough for beginners. Intermediate and advanced athletes can increase weight for greater difficulty. It’s an ideal exercise for all athletes, including those focused on calisthenics, bodybuilding, swimming, and running, because it targets the biceps, forearms, and abs in one exercise.

Perform three to five sets of 10 to 12 reps with moderate weight.

Bicep Curl Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Exercises

Variations of the bicep curl involve altering the equipment and stance to target the biceps in different ways.

The standing dumbbell curl and seated dumbbell curl are two popular options because they challenge beginners and intermediate lifters or allow advanced athletes to make greater gains.

Athletes hoping to increase strength and mass prefer the Zottman curl because it’s a greater challenge and has the added benefit of improving grip strength.

These are the variations of bicep curls:

  1. Standing dumbbell curl (bilateral, alternating)
  2. Seated dumbbell curl (bilateral, alternating)
  3. Zottman curl
  4. Incline dumbbell curl (bilateral, alternating)
  5. Palms-out incline curl

1. Standing Dumbbell Curl (Bilateral, Alternating)

Standing dumbbell curls work the biceps and forearms. 

To perform the standing dumbbell curls, stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Keeping the spine neutral, engage the core for stability. Hold dumbbells in each hand and curl them toward the chest. Pause at the top and then release to the starting position. 

Alternatively, lifters can curl one arm at a time in an alternative pattern to focus on each arm and make the exercise easier.

Common mistakes for standing dumbbell curls involve poor form and relying too much on momentum. The weight should be light enough to maintain proper form throughout the exercise without straining the back or shoulders. Use slow controlled movement to avoid relying on momentum.

This exercise is beginner-friendly and allows lifters to isolate the bicep muscles to make gains in strength and mass. Choose a lighter weight until the proper form becomes natural, then gradually increase the difficulty. 

Perform three to five sets of 10 to 12 repetitions at a manageable weight. Increase the weight to make the exercise harder.

2. Seated Dumbbell Curl (Bilateral, Alternating)

Seated dumbbell curls isolate the biceps and forearms to increase strength and mass.

To perform a seated dumbbell curl, sit on a bench, keeping the feet flat on the floor. Hold the dumbbells at the sides and curl up to the chest while keeping the elbows close to the body. Squeeze and pause at the top before slowly releasing to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this exercise is using too much weight to maintain proper form. It’s better to start lighter and focus on engaging the biceps to make gains with proper form before advancing the weight.

Seated dumbbell curls isolate the biceps and forearms by eliminating assistance from the lower body and back. While it’s not especially difficult, beginners may struggle with this exercise until they have enough strength to lift the weights. 

Try performing three to five sets of 10 to 12 repetitions with a manageable weight.

3. Zottman Curl

The Zottman curl targets the biceps and forearms while improving grip strength.

To perform the Zottman curl, stand with feet in line with the shoulders. Hold dumbbells in each hand at the sides. Keep the elbows close to the body and curl the weights up to the chest. 

Pause at the top of the motion, squeeze the biceps, and rotate the weights so that the palms face outward. Push down to the starting position, pause, and repeat.

The most common mistake for this exercise is using too much weight. It’s better to go lighter and increase the reps to make the most gains across the board.

The Zottman curl is popular because it’s so versatile for beginners up to advanced lifters. Using lighter weights tones the biceps and forearms but increases grip strength and endurance. Increasing weight allows athletes to build strength and mass in the biceps.

Use light to moderate weight over three to five sets of 12 to 15 reps to improve grip strength and overall toning. Lifters hoping to build mass and strength should use heavier weights, about ten pounds less than a normal curl. Start with one to three sets of eight to 10 reps.

4. Incline Dumbbell Curl (Bilateral, Alternating)

Incline dumbbell curls work the biceps, especially the biceps brachii, harder than a standard bicep curl. 

To perform the incline dumbbell curl, lifters can work both arms at the same time or alternate. Set an incline bench to a 45-degree to 60-degree angle. Sit with the back against the bench and engage the core muscles.  

Hold the dumbbells to the sides for the starting position. Curl the weights up toward the shoulders with palms facing up. Pause at the top of the motion and squeeze the biceps before releasing them back to the starting position.

The most common mistakes are using too much weight and relying on momentum instead of working the muscles. It’s better to use a lighter weight to perfect the proper form and feel the burn. The key to building strength and mass with this exercise is to take it slow and feel the contractions.

This exercise is best for intermediate to advanced lifters. Use moderate weight for two to three sets of 10 to 15 reps. 

5. Palms-Out Incline Curl

The palms-out incline curl works the inner side of the biceps to give lifters that desirable peak.

To perform this exercise, set an incline bench between 60 and 70 degrees. Sit with the back against the bench and engage the abs. Holding the dumbbells in each hand, palms facing out, curl toward the shoulders. 

Pause at the top of the motion and squeeze the biceps to feel the tension in the inner region. Slowly release to the starting position in a slow, controlled motion.

The most common mistake for this exercise is using too much weight because it can put stress on the elbow and wrist joints.

This exercise is popular with lifters who want definition along the inner bicep to develop the peak. The palms-out incline curl is an intermediate exercise. 

Use light to moderate weight for three to five sets of six to eight reps.

6. Incline Hammer Curl

Use this variation to target the brachioradialis and brachialis a bit more. It’s also excellent for building endurance.

To perform an incline hammer curl, use the incline bench and dumbbells. Grasp the dumbbells with a hammer grip. Engage the core, keep the back and head against the bench, and curl up to the shoulders. 

Pause at the top and squeeze the biceps to feel the tension. Slowly return to the starting position.

The most common mistake for this exercise is using too much weight to maintain proper form. It’s better to work with less weight and perfect the form with more reps.

This variation is a popular option for lifters and athletes hoping to build bicep endurance and strength. It’s beginner friendly but can be a difference-maker for intermediate and advanced athletes wanting to break out of a plateau. 

Do two to four sets of 10 to 15 reps with moderate weight.

4. Hammer Curl

The hammer curl targets the brachialis, brachioradialis, and biceps brachii muscles. It also adds mass to the forearms. 

This exercise is more about aesthetics than strength because it gives biceps that desirable chiseled look. While athletes gain strength, the hammer curl is more about building muscle mass.

To perform a hammer curl, stand with feet in line with the shoulders. Hold a kettlebell in each hand with hands to the sides of the body. Lift up toward the shoulders, keeping the wrists straight. Pause and squeeze the biceps at the top of the motion, then slowly release.

Common mistakes with the hammer curl include using too much weight and relying on momentum. Lifters should focus on lighter weight and higher rep counts to focus on maintaining the proper form and forcing the biceps to do the work.

Variations of the hammer curl include the standard chin-up, machine-assisted chin-up, band-assisted chin-up, and L-sit chin-up.

To make gains, it’s best to incorporate hammer curls into an upper body workout at least twice per week.

Men and women can make gains in mass and strength by balancing traditional bicep curls with hammer curls. While bicep curls target the short head, hammer curls work the long head, allowing lifters to balance their bicep work.

Athletes focused on calisthenics, runners, and swimmers may not care to work hammer curls into their routines. However, bodybuilders need to consider the hammer curl for sculpting those tough-to-reach spots.

Stick with three to five sets of eight to 12 reps, but start with a lighter weight and increase a little with each set.

Hammer Curl for Kettlebell Biceps Muscle Hypertrophy

Variations of the kettlebell hammer curl involve swapping equipment. Instead of using a kettlebell, athletes can perform hammer curl variations to replicate the bicep and forearm work. 

This shift allows athletes to vary their routines and target the muscles in slightly different ways. The standard chin-up is a popular variation that pushes an athlete, and it’s a marker of strength.

To maximize strength and mass, lifters should work up to the L-sit chin-up because it challenges them to overcome the lower body as dead weight. 

The following are the variations of kettlebell hammer curls:

  1. Standard chin-up
  2. Machine-assisted chin-up
  3. Band-assisted chin-up
  4. L-sit chin-up

1. Standard Chin-up

The standard chin-up is a classic strength-training exercise that works the biceps but also targets other muscle groups. Athletes also engage the core, hips, and back.

To perform a standard chin-up, grab a stable, suspended bar with both hands, palms facing the body. Pull up taking the chin toward the bar, pause at the top, then slowly lower back down.

The most common mistakes for the standard chin-ups include not using the shoulders, rocking with momentum instead of using the bicep muscles, and not being strong enough. 

Chin-ups require enough strength to lift the body. If that’s not possible without rocking, it may be best to try an adapted version to build enough strength. Also, athletes need to engage the shoulder muscles early in the movement to maximize the exercise.

Chin-ups are extremely popular bodyweight exercises that build strength in the biceps and other muscle groups. It’s key for increasing overall strength and control over the body. 

Athletes should aim to perform three sets of 12 to 14 reps.

2. Machine-Assisted Chin-Up

Machine-assisted chin-ups focus on the biceps but also work the shoulders, back, and core.

To perform a machine-assisted chin-up, use the appropriate assisted chin-up machine. Grasp the bar with palms facing the body and even with the shoulders. Start with arms fully extended.

Engage the core and pull up as high as possible, taking the chin toward the bar. Keep the body straight. Pause at the top of the motion, then slowly lower back to the starting position. 

It’s not easy to make mistakes with this exercise, but it’s important to use full movement and keep the body straight to get the full benefit in the biceps.

Machine-assisted chin-ups are beginner-friendly and help athletes build up to more challenging variations. It’s a strength-building option that works best with three to five sets of eight to 10 reps. 

3. Band-Assisted Chin-Up

The band-assisted chin-up also targets the biceps, core, shoulders, and back. It’s a step up from the machine-assisted variation and a step down from the standard chin-up.

To perform a band-assisted chin-up, grab a resistance band and get to a stable bar. Wrap the resistance band around the bar and loop it through itself. Pull tight and slip the other end of the band under one or both feet or knees.

Grasp the bar with both hands, keeping them even with the shoulders and palms toward the body. Pull up taking the chin toward the bar. Pause for a few seconds, then lower back to the starting position.

The most common mistake for this exercise is trying to perform it without sufficient strength and control over the body. If an athlete does not have sufficient strength, it’s better to build up to a band-assisted chin-up with the machine-assisted variation.

Beginners with enough strength can handle this exercise, though it’s more of an intermediate level. A band-assisted chin-up is a popular option for progressing to a standard chin-up because it helps athletes build the necessary strength and control.

Start with three to five sets of eight to 10 reps.

4. L-sit Chin-Up

L-sit chin-ups may be the most challenging way to address the biceps while engaging other muscle groups, primarily the core and hips.

To perform an L-sit chin-up, athletes need a stable bar setup that can support their body weight. Grasp the bar with hands shoulder-width apart. Engage the abs and lift the legs to a 90-degree angle. 

Using the arms, back, and core, lift the body up, taking the chin toward the bar. Pause for a few seconds and then slowly lower back down to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this exercise is hyperextending the neck, which can lead to an injury. Additionally, do not lock out the arms at any point.

This exercise is popular among advanced athletes because it both requires and demonstrates exceptional strength and control over the body. 

This exercise is typically low rep with no more than five to eight reps per set. To max out, athletes should attempt to do as many L-sit chin-ups as they can manage with proper form. 

5. Kneeling Preacher Curl

Kettlebell kneeling preacher curls target the brachialis muscle and engage the lower body somewhat. This exercise helps strengthen and stabilize the brachialis muscle, which supports elbow flexion.

To perform a kneeling preacher curl, squat with a kettlebell in each hand. Rest the elbows on the knees and extend the arms out to the starting position. Using slow, controlled movements, curl the weights toward the shoulders. Pause at the top of the motion and slowly release.

The most common mistake is moving too fast through the motion. It should be slow and controlled to isolate the biceps properly.

Variations of the kneeling preacher curl include a reverse-grip barbell row, cable-seated row, and incline dumbbell row. Add this exercise to an upper body workout one to three times per week.

Men and women across all sports can make gains in mass and strength with this exercise. Children should not perform this exercise. Use lower weight to perform two to four sets of 10 to 12 reps.

Kneeling Preacher Curl for Kettlebell Biceps Muscle Growth

Variations of the kneeling preacher curl involve using different equipment and stances.These variations allow athletes to utilize different equipment to vary routines and still work on the same muscle groups.

The cable seated barbell row is the most popular variation, but the incline barbell row is best for building strength and mass. As you can see, there are many different types of kneeling preacher curl alternatives and variaitons.

The following are variations of the kneeling preacher curl:

  1. Reverse-grip barbell row
  2. Cable seated row (underhand grip)
  3. Incline dumbbell row (underhand grip)

1. Reverse-Grip Barbell Row

The reverse-grip barbell row works the biceps, but it also engages the upper back and shoulders. To perform this exercise, stand with feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent. Keep the back straight and almost parallel to the floor. 

Grip the bar with hands in line with the shoulders and feet, using a palm-up grip. Start with the head up and the bar hanging in front of the body. Lift the bar, keeping elbows close to the body. 

At the top position, squeeze the biceps and shoulders for a few seconds. Release the bar slowly to the starting position.

The most common mistakes involve form, like keeping the legs straight or not bending forward enough. Be wary of too much tension in the neck and spine as well. 

The reverse-grip barbell row is popular among intermediate and advanced lifters because it’s a comprehensive upper body exercise. Start with a lower weight than usual to master the form first. Perform one to three sets of six to eight reps.

2. Cable Seated Row (Underhand Grip)

The cable-seated row with an underhand grip isolates the biceps to increase strength. To perform this exercise, sit on a bench and grip the bar with an underhand grip, meaning palms up.

Keeping the back straight and shoulders relaxed, pull the bar toward the chest, squeezing the shoulder blades together. Pause at the top of the motion and slowly release the bar to the starting position.

The most common mistake with the cable seated row exercise is rocking instead of using the biceps and back muscles to do the work. This exercise is a beginner-friendly option that helps build strength for more advanced exercises. Start with two to four sets of 10 to 12 reps.

3. Incline Dumbbell Row (Underhand Grip)

The incline dumbbell row with an underhand grip targets the biceps, lats, rhomboids, erector spinae, and traps.

To perform this variation, lie on an incline bench with dumbbells in each hand and arms extended. Pull the weights toward the chest, squeezing at the top of the motion. Slowly release the weights to the starting position.

The most common mistake is using too much weight before mastering the proper form. Start with lighter weights and more reps to focus on slow, controlled movements. Work up to higher weights and lower reps to avoid injuries.

This exercise is popular among intermediate and advanced lifters seeking variety and a comprehensive workout. It can build mass and strength in several muscle groups with heavier weights. Do one to three sets of eight to 10 reps.

6. Single Arm Cop Hold Curl

The single arm cop hold curl targets the brachioradialis, brachialis, and brachii. This exercise also engages the forearm and wrist to a degree.

Single Arm Cop Hold Curl
Single Arm Cop Hold Curl

Choosing the single-arm curl allows lifters to focus entirely on one arm at a time to ensure proper form and maximize the work. 

To perform a single arm curl, stand with feet shoulder-width apart. With a kettlebell in one hand, start with the arm fully extended. Curl toward the shoulder until the forearm reaches the bicep, and squeeze the bicep for a second before releasing it to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this exercise is swinging the kettlebell instead of slowly lifting it. Excessive momentum causes the kettlebell to bang against the forearm, and it reduces the impact on the biceps.

The variations of this exercise include the cable rope hammer curl, the dumbbell hammer curl, the cable rope preacher hammer curl, and the incline hammer curl.

Add this exercise into an upper body routine one to three times a week.

Men and women can benefit from a single arm cop hold curl because it allows athletes to focus on one arm at a time to get the most benefit from the lift. Children should not perform this exercise.

Bodybuilders can use this exercise to balance their bicep size. Additionally, single-arm curls allow injured athletes to use different weights so they can keep working during recovery. 

To bulk, use a moderate to heavy weight for two to three sets of five to eight slow repetitions. For strength and definition, use light to moderate weights for two to four sets of six to 10 reps.

Single Arm Cop Hold Curl Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Muscles

Variations of the single arm cop hold curl involve using different equipment and positions, like cable machines or dumbbells, and working at an incline. The variations alter the angle slightly to allow athletes to work the biceps in different ways for a comprehensive lift.

The cable rope hammer curl is the most popular option because the cable provides continuous resistance. However, the cable rope preacher curl is probably better for building strength and mass because it limits the range of motion for even more focus on the single arm. 

These are the variations of single-arm cop hold curls:

  1. Cable rope hammer curl
  2. Dumbbell hammer curl (bilateral, alternating, seated)
  3. Cable rope preacher hammer curl
  4. Incline hammer curl

1. Cable Rope Hammer Curl

The cable rope hammer curl builds strength in the biceps and forearms.

To perform this exercise, attach a rope handle to a cable machine. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and engage the core. Using a neutral grip and keeping the elbows at the sides, curl toward the shoulders, moving only the forearms. 

Pause at the top of the motion for a few seconds before gradually releasing back to the starting position.

The most common mistake for this exercise is using momentum by way of moving the upper arms. Moving the upper arms alleviates tension on the biceps and doesn’t force them to do the work.

Cable hammer curls are popular for lifters of all skill levels who desire constant tension throughout the exercise. Perform two to four sets of eight to 12 reps.

2. Dumbbell Hammer Curl (Bilateral, Alternating, Seated)

The dumbbell hammer curl builds mass and strength by working the biceps at different points throughout the movement.

To perform a dumbbell hammer curl, lifters can stand or sit and work both arms simultaneously or alternate them. Sit or stand with legs in line with the shoulders. Hold the dumbbells with a neutral grip and curl up so that the thumbs approach the shoulders. 

Pause at the top of the movement and squeeze the biceps to feel the tension. Release back to the starting position with a slow, controlled motion.

The most common mistake with this exercise is moving too fast to maintain tension in the biceps. 

This exercise is popular with intermediate and advanced lifters who want to boost mass and strength fast. Using moderate to heavy weight, perform two to four sets of five to eight reps.

3. Cable Rope Preacher Hammer Curl

The cable rope preacher hammer curl primarily targets the biceps, but it also works the forearms.

To perform this exercise, pull a preacher bench up to a cable machine. Sit on the bench a few feet from the cable machine. Attach a rope to the machine. Fully extend the arms on the pad, holding the rope for the starting position.

Slowly curl the weight by pulling the hands to the shoulders. The upper arms should remain on the bench. Pause and squeeze at the top of the motion. Slowly release back to the starting position.

It is not easy to make mistakes with this exercise because the preacher bench limits the range of motion, and the cable machine is easy to work with as long as the lifter uses an appropriate weight.

This beginner-friendly exercise builds mass and helps lifters gain definition since the cable provides consistent tension. Do three to five sets of 10 to 12 reps with moderate weight.

4. Incline Hammer Curl

The incline hammer curl strengthens the biceps and improves wrist stability. It can also increase arm size and improve the overall range of motion in the elbows.

To perform the incline hammer curl, set an incline bench at 60 to 70 degrees. Sit with the back against the bench and a dumbbell on either side. Using an overhand grip with the dumbbells facing forward, curl toward the shoulder.

Pause at the top of the motion when the forearm is vertical. Slowly release to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this movement is twisting the dumbbells. Lifters need to keep the dumbbells facing forward and only use the biceps.

The incline hammer curl is an intermediate to advanced exercise intended to build strength fast. Start with a lighter weight with one to three sets of 12 to 15 reps. Gradually increase weight without breaking form.

7. Armpit Curl

The armpit curl is another name for the kettlebell row or armpit row. It is a compound exercise that targets the biceps while working the upper back, shoulders, core, hips, and legs.

Kettlebell rows or armpit curls focus on the biceps brachii, brachialis, and brachioradialis to improve endurance and strength.

To perform this exercise, stand with the right foot in front of the left in a staggered stance, similar to a lunge. Hinge at the hips so that the torso runs parallel to the floor. Hold the kettlebell with the right hand using a neutral grip.

Pull the weight up in a row, careful to keep the elbow close to the body. Pause at the top of the motion for a second, then release to the starting position. Switch sides to perform the exercise with the other arm.

The most common mistake with this exercise is failing to maintain tension through the core to keep the back straight. 

Variations of the armpit curl are dead-stop row, half-kneeling lat pulldown, RDL row, and bird dog row.

Add this kettlebell exercise into a workout routine two to three days per week.

Male and female athletes across all disciplines can make gains in strength and endurance with this exercise. Additionally, since it’s a whole-body exercise, it can improve balance and control. Children should not perform this exercise.

Do two to four sets of 10 to 12 reps with light to moderate weight.

Armpit Curl for Kettlebell Biceps Pump

Variations of the armpit curl involve using different machines and stances to target the biceps from different angles.

The most popular variation is the RDL row, but the dead-stop row is best for building mass. To increase strength, try the half-kneeling lat pulldown.

The following are variations of the armpit curl:

  1. Dead-stop Row
  2. Half-kneeling Lat Pulldown
  3. RDL Row
  4. Birddog Row

1. Dead-Stop Row

The dead-stop row works one arm at a time for athletes who want to bulk the biceps, triceps, shoulders, and back.

To perform this exercise, put the left knee and hand on a bench for stability. Using a dumbbell with a neutral grip in the right hand, pull up to the chest. Hold at the chest for a second before slowly releasing back to the ground. Finish the desired reps and switch arms.

The most common mistakes with this movement are not keeping the chest parallel to the floor and moving too fast through the exercise. Use slow controlled movements for maximum benefit.

This intermediate exercise is a popular variation for building mass. Use heavier weights for one to three sets of five to eight reps. 

2. Half-Kneeling Lat Pulldown

This exercise is another total-body option that works the biceps to build strength. It also strengthens the triceps, shoulders, back, and core while improving stability throughout the lower body.

To perform this exercise, kneel before a cable machine. Using a bar attachment, pull down toward the shoulders, pausing for a few seconds with the bar at the shoulders before releasing to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this exercise is relying on momentum and rocking through the reps. Focus on slow, controlled movements with the entire body engaged.

The half-kneeling lat pulldown is a popular intermediate-level exercise because it builds strength and stability in multiple muscle groups. Choose a light to medium weight until comfortable with the proper form. Do three to five sets of 10 to 12 reps. 

3. RDL Row

RDL rows work the biceps along with the triceps, shoulders, back, core, and lower body to build strength, stability, and endurance. 

To perform an RDL row, lifters combine Romanian deadlifts with a bent-over row. Stand with feet in line with the hips and a slight bend in the knees, holding a bar in front of the body.

Hinge at the hips, keeping the back in a neutral position. Lower the bar until it reaches the knees.

Row the bar toward the core, careful to keep the head in line with the neck. Lower the bar back to the knees, pause for a second, and then drive forward with hips to return to the upright stance.

Common mistakes with this exercise involve poor form, usually falling to keep a slight arch in the back and shifting weight to the toes instead of heels.

This intermediate to advanced exercise is a popular option for increasing strength and stability throughout the body. 

To increase strength and endurance, use a light to moderate weight for two to four sets of 10 to 15 reps. For bulking, do one to three sets of six to eight reps with heavier weights. 

4. Bird Dog Row

This exercise is another whole-body variation that strengthens the biceps while working other muscle groups, including the core, back, and lower body. It also enhances an athlete’s bodily control.

To perform this exercise, kneel on a bench with the right knee and stabilize the body with the left arm. Extend the left leg straight out behind the body and hold a kettlebell in the right hand. Engage the core throughout the exercise.

Keeping the body parallel to the floor, row with the kettlebell by pulling up. Pause at the top of the motion to feel the tension throughout the body, especially in the biceps and triceps. Slowly release to the starting position. Complete the reps for one side, then switch to the other.

The most common mistake with this exercise is attempting it without the strength, control, and stability to maintain proper form. 

The bird dog or quadruped row is an advanced-level exercise that’s popular among experienced weightlifters because it increases mass, strength, and definition. Use moderate weight for three to five sets of 10 to 12 reps.

8. Single Arm Reverse Curl

Single arm reverse curls build the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, but they work the entire arm to some degree. Athletes should notice mass gains with reverse curls, and using a single arm makes it easier to create a balanced appearance.

To perform this exercise, stand with feet in line with the shoulders. Holding a kettlebell in each hand and keeping the elbows steady, pull the kettlebells toward the shoulders. Pause at the top of the motion and squeeze the biceps, then lower back to the starting position.

The most common mistake is not using the proper form. Use lower weights and slow, controlled movements to avoid injury.

Variations of the single-arm reverse curl are the concentration curl, close-grip concentration curl, cable concentration curl, and band concentration curl.

To make gains with this exercise, it’s best to add it into upper body workouts two or three times per week. 

Men and women can develop balanced bicep definitions with this exercise. Children should not perform this exercise. Bodybuilders may be the only athletes who truly need to use this exercise to reach a balanced look.

Use limited weight and progress by adding more reps and then extra sets. Start with two to three sets of six to eight reps.

Single Arm Reverse Curl Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Pump

Variations of this exercise involve using different equipment, like cable machines and resistance bands, or altering grips. Each variation targets the muscles in a slightly different way and allows for a progression to more advanced exercises.

The concentration curl is the most popular option and the best for building strength and mass.

These are four variations of the single arm reverse curl:

  1. Concentration curl (seated, standing)
  2. Close-grip concentration curl
  3. Cable concentration curl
  4. Band concentration curl

1. Concentration Curl (Seated, Standing)

The concentration curl targets the biceps, primarily the brachii, working one arm at a time. 

To perform this exercise, sit on a bench. Hold a dumbbell or kettlebell in one hand with the elbow inside the thigh or knee. Slowly lower the weight toward the floor for the starting position. Curl the weight toward the shoulder, careful to keep the upper arm still.

Pause at the top, and squeeze the bicep. Using slow, controlled movements, lower the weight back to the starting position.

The most common mistake with the concentration curl variation is attempting too much weight leading to strain on the muscles through the arm, shoulders, and back.

This variation is popular for isolating and building the biceps. Use light to moderate weight with one to three sets of eight to 12 reps in the beginning. Progress to more sets and reps, or add weight for more advanced lifters hoping to bulk.

2. Close-Grip Concentration Curl

The close-grip concentration curl targets the outer biceps to build mass and definition.

To perform this variation, use a barbell and bench. Sit on the bench and lean forward. Grasp the bar with hands close together and a palm-up grip. Start with the bar lowered, and arms extended. Curl up, keeping the upper arms still and only moving forearms.

Pause at the top of the motion when the forearms touch the biceps. Squeeze the biceps and then release the bar back to the starting position.

The most common mistake is moving too fast through the reps. Take each rep slow to concentrate on each movement and maintain good posture.

This exercise is an intermediate to advanced variation for bulking and defining the biceps. Use a moderate weight and perform two to four sets of eight to ten reps.

3. Cable Concentration Curl

Like other concentration curls, the cable variation targets the biceps by removing other muscle groups from the equation. 

To perform this exercise, use a cable machine with a handle or rope. Stand or sit near the machine and curl the handle toward the shoulder, careful to only move the forearm. Pause at the top and squeeze the bicep before releasing the handle to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this movement is going too fast and missing the concentration aspect of the exercise. Slow, controlled movements with only the forearm moving is the way to isolate and work the biceps. 

This variation is popular among beginners because the cable provides tension and resistance, but it’s easy to control. Do three to five sets of 10 to 15 reps. 

4. Band Concentration Curl

This variation also targets the biceps.

To perform this version, wrap a resistance band around one foot and sit on a bench or stand. Hold the other end in one hand and curl up with the forearm, keeping the upper arm still. Pause at the top and squeeze the bicep before slowly releasing to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this variation is not concentrating on isolating the bicep. Only move the forearm and use slow, deliberate movements to focus on the biceps.

This variation is popular for lifters at any level because it only requires a resistance band, making it available almost anywhere. Do three to five sets of 10 to 15 reps.

9. Hang Clean

The hang clean engages the biceps, but it also works the lower body and core. This exercise is all about building power and strength.

To perform a hang clean with a kettlebell, start with the weight on the floor between the feet. With the feet shoulder-width apart, bend forward. Clean the weight up the shoulder by driving up with the legs. Rotate the wrist through the movement.

Lower the weight until it hangs between the legs. Maintain tension through the hamstrings. That counts as one repetition.

The most common mistakes are leading with the hands and swinging too much. Leading with the hands strains the wrists, and swinging incorrectly causes strain and increases the risk of injury.

Variations of the hang clean are the cable preacher curl, EZ-bar preacher curl, dumbbell preacher curl, spider curl, and machine preacher curl. Add hang cleans to a workout two to three times per week.

Men and women across all sports can benefit from learning this exercise. It works multiple muscle groups in one exercise and helps athletes focus on body control while building strength and mass. Children should not perform this maneuver.

Do three to five sets of four to six reps using a light to moderate weight. Gradually increase the number of sets and amount of weight while reducing the number of repetitions to make bigger gains.

Hang Clean Variations for Kettlebell Biceps Pump

Variations of the hang clean use different equipment and positions to target the biceps. Some variations use cables or machines, while others rely on dumbbells or EZ-bars.

The most popular variation would be any of the preacher curls because they allow lifters to engage the biceps while working other muscle groups to do more work with fewer exercises.

Further, the preacher curls are the best hang clean variations for building mass and strength.

The following exercises are variations of the hang clean:

  1. Cable preacher curl (underhand, hammer)
  2. EZ-bar preacher curl
  3. Dumbbell preacher curl (bilateral, single-arm, hammer)
  4. Spider curl (dumbbell, EZ-bar)
  5. Machine preacher curl (bilateral, single-arm)

1. Cable Preacher Curl (Underhand, Hammer)

The cable preacher curl works the biceps and, to a lesser degree, the forearms and shoulders.

To perform the cable preacher curl, sit on a preacher bench with arms resting on the pad. Attach a rope handle to the cable machine. Use an underhand grip to perform a more traditional curl or alter the grip to do a hammer curl and target the brachialis muscles more.

Regardless of grip, curl up toward the face or shoulder. Squeeze the biceps and pause for a few seconds before releasing to the starting position.

The most common mistake is going too heavy with the weight and losing form. Keep things light and increase reps and sets before adding weight.

This variation provides consistent resistance throughout the exercise, making it desirable for athletes who want to make big gains fast. It’s easy enough for beginners to learn but by varying sets, reps, and the amount of weight, advanced athletes can make gains.

Start with lower weight and two to four sets of eight to 10 reps.

2. EZ-bar Preacher Curl

Like other preacher curls, this variation isolates the biceps.

To perform this variation, use a preacher bench and an EZ-bar. Hold the bar with an underhand grip, upper arms resting on the bench. Curl toward the shoulders, pausing at the top to squeeze the biceps. Slowly lower the bar back to the starting position.

The most common mistake with this variation is using too much weight. It’s better to use less weight to maintain proper form. 

The EZ-bar preacher curl is popular for isolating the biceps to push through plateaus and build mass. The EZ-bar is easy to use for this beginner-friendly variation. Advanced lifters can increase weight.

Use moderate weight for two to four sets of eight to 10 reps.

3. Dumbbell Preacher Curl (Bilateral, Single-arm, Hammer)

Dumbbell preacher curls work the biceps and, to a lesser degree, the forearms.

To perform this isolation exercise, use dumbbells in one or both hands with a preacher bench. It’s also possible to adjust the grip to do hammer curls on the preacher bench. Either way, rest the arms on the bench and curl the weights, pausing at the top to squeeze the biceps before releasing.

The most common misstep with this exercise is using too much weight. Reduce weight to avoid injuries, like muscle strains and tears.

The dumbbell preacher curl is a popular option for beginner and intermediate lifters hoping to increase strength and mass. Use moderate weights for two to four sets of eight to 10 reps.

4. Spider Curl (Dumbbell, EZ-bar)

Spider curls isolate the biceps to create maximum definition.

To perform a spider curl, use an incline bench. Lie on the bench and engage the core before starting. Using dumbbells or an EZ-bar, curl up to the shoulders, keeping the upper arms steady. Pause at the top and squeeze the biceps before slowly releasing to the starting position.

Since the entire body is suspended on a bench, it’s easy to isolate the biceps and tough to make a mistake. Using too much weight is about the only way to go wrong, other than moving too fast through the exercise. Opt for lighter weights and slow, controlled motions.

This variation is popular among athletes as a finishing exercise because it’s all about definition and hyperfocusing on the biceps. While beginners can handle the maneuver, it’s more helpful for experienced lifters seeking that elusive definition.

Use a moderate weight for four to six sets of eight to 10 reps.

5. Machine Preacher Curl (Bilateral, Single-arm)

The machine preacher curls isolate the biceps. 

To perform the machine preacher curls, find an appropriate machine. Sit and select the appropriate weight. Adjust the pad to a comfortable level. Curl the arms up, pausing at the top and squeezing the biceps for a second. Slowly release back to the starting position.

It’s not easy to make mistakes when using the machine, but using too much weight could cause an injury.

The machine preacher curl is popular among beginners and people who prefer working with machines. Do two to four sets of eight to 10 reps with moderate weight.

Best Kettlebell Biceps Workout Exercises for Muscle Growth

Looking to build massive biceps? These workout routines aim to pack on mass fast, and there’s something for every skill level.

  1. Hard And Heavy Kettlebell Biceps Workout
  2. Kettlebell Biceps Workout For Beginners
  3. Machine Pump Kettlebell Biceps Workout

1. Hard and Heavy Kettlebell Biceps Workout

A Kettlebell Biceps working routine should be given with sets, movement names, and their purposes.

  1. Ballistic Curl
  2. Zottman Curl
  3. Hammer Curl

Building mass and strength fast requires focus and isolation of the muscles. The ballistic curl and Zottman curl balance strengthening with mass building and allow lifters to truly isolate the biceps to make gains. Add in the hammer curl to focus on the other end of the biceps for a comprehensive bicep workout.

2. Kettlebell Biceps Workout for Beginners

A Kettlebell Biceps working routine should be given with sets, movement names, and their purposes.

  1. Bicep Curl
  2. Zottman Curl
  3. Machine-assisted Chin-up

Beginners need to focus on building strength and mastering the proper form to move on to more advanced exercises. The bicep curl and Zottman curl are easy to learn and help beginners develop both strength and control. 

Finally, the machine-assisted chin-up begins the progression toward a standard chin-up and provides markers for progress that beginners need.

3. Machine Pump Kettlebell Biceps Workout

Kettlebell lovers hoping to experiment with machines for some workouts will appreciate the following exercises.

  1. Cable-seated row
  2. Cable concentration curl
  3. Cable preacher curls

These three exercises use the same machine to target the biceps from different angles by varying grip, position, and stance. Combining these cable exercises allows lifters to build strength and mass for a balanced look.

Kettlebell Biceps Exercise Routines for Different Genders and Ages

Kettlebells are easy to work with because they have handles and come in various sizes to accommodate different skill levels. 

There is no hard and fast rule for what men and women should consider because these exercises all work the biceps, making them useful for all adults. That said, men and women may prefer different routines that focus on their strengths and what they hope to accomplish.

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Men?

Men wanting to focus on biceps and building both mass and strength need an exercise routine that they can vary with their skill level. These exercises are the best for accomplishing all three goals.

  1. Ballistic Curl
  2. Chin-ups
  3. Hang Clean

Combining these three exercises creates a balanced biceps workout that increases strength, mass, and definition. It’s easy to adjust the exercises to match the lifter’s skill level, so beginners can find success, and advanced lifters can increase their definition.

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Women?

Women tend to struggle slightly more with upper body strength, so focusing on exercises to build those muscles without necessarily bulking up is key. The following exercises allow women to focus on strength training.

  1. Bicep Curl
  2. Zottman Curl
  3. Chin-ups

The bicep curl and chin-ups are classic strength-training exercises that women can adapt to their skill level. It’s easy to start with lower weights and assisted chin-ups to increase strength. 

Finally, the Zottman curl is an excellent addition for women because it helps them improve grip strength and control. Improved grip strength is key to mastering other exercises. It is also possible to perform this exercise with low weights and higher reps.

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Children?

Children should not use kettlebells unless cleared by a physician and supervised by adults. Kettlebells have handles and come in lighter weights, making them desirable for smaller hands.

There is an increased risk of injury for kids attempting strength training. It’s better to focus on bodyweight exercises and teaching bodily control before introducing kettlebells.

Is There a Difference for Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Different Athletes?

Yes, there is a difference between kettlebell biceps exercises for different types of athletes. While all athletes can benefit from any of the above kettlebell biceps exercises, some may be better for certain sports than others. For example, runners do not need to have massive biceps, but strengthening those muscles could reduce the chance of injury. 

On the other hand, swimmers need strong upper bodies to propel them through the water. While massive muscles aren’t necessary, they need to be strong and have excellent flexibility and range of motion to improve lap speed.

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Calisthenics?

The best kettlebell biceps exercises for calisthenics focus on increasing flexibility and range of motion. While athletes focused on calisthenics typically use bodyweight exercises, incorporating some kettlebells can add variety. Mix in some bicep curls and hang cleans with chin-ups for a comprehensive workout that could lead to major gains in endurance.

  1. Chin-ups
  2. Bicep Curls
  3. Hang Clean

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Swimmers?

Swimmers rely on upper body strength more than mass to perform well in the pool. That means choosing kettlebell biceps exercises that build strength fast and allow isolation of the biceps while potentially working other arm muscles.

  1. Hang Cleans
  2. Single Arm Cop Hold Curl
  3. Single Arm Reverse Curl

All three of these exercises focus on building strength and isolating the biceps to make gains. If swimmers only have a kettlebell available, an upper body workout with these three exercises should yield a noticeable difference in the pool. 

What Are the Best Kettlebell Biceps Exercises for Runners?

The best kettlebell biceps exercises for runners focus on other parts of the body as well as the biceps. The following exercises strengthen the biceps but also address other key muscle groups.

  1. Squatting Cable EZ-bar Curl
  2. Hang Clean
  3. Chin-ups

These exercises focus on strength and endurance. The squatting cable EZ-bar curl and hang clean work the lower body as well as the biceps to give runners a more comprehensive workout. 

Chin-ups are another excellent exercise for runners because it works the biceps while addressing other important muscle groups, including the core. Plus, runners can choose to do chin-ups that match their skill and strength levels if they can’t handle the standard version.

Can Bicep Exercises Be Performed With Tricep Exercises?

Yes, it is safe to work both the biceps and triceps on the same day. Though biceps and triceps are in different areas of the arm, one in front and the other in the back, you can tackle both of these muscle groups at once. If you are looking to maximize gains, it is recommended to follow a triceps workout guide for best results.

What Are the Best Muscle-building Exercises for Other Body Parts?

Just working the biceps would leave an athlete looking unbalanced, at the very least. Working on other muscle groups is necessary, and these are some of the best exercises to accomplish that.

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